Preview Week 22! Last Week!

This is our LAST WEEK in our main CSA season!

Thank you for joining us on this grand food adventure in 2018!

Our Fall CSA program will kick off NEXT week on October 25th. We only have a few spots left so snag one ASAP! For those in our Fall CSA program, we have a few *new* crops planned. Get ready for rutabaga and parsnips, to name a few.

Link to Fall CSA sign up HERE.

For our last week in the main CSA season, we have a LARGE share in store:

+ Sweet Potatoes

+ Butternut Squash

+ Garlic

+ Lettuce

+ Popcorn

+ Savoy Cabbage

+ Broccoli and/or Cauliflower

This year has been the strangest yet for weather in my recollection. Some crops failed outright, many struggled, and others were just delayed. Thanks for hanging in there with us for the ups and downs! We have the best CSA members who show our program great support. THANK YOU! See everyone this Thursday.

Psst… don’t forget the last Honeywood dinner series is this Wednesday! Tickets here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/honeywood-south-farm-series-west-sixth-beer-dinner-tickets-50701387214

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The Last South Farm Dinner at Honeywood

Good morning friends!

The last of the South Farm Dinner Series event is coming up next week. This dinner will be hosted at the Honeywood restaurant over in the Summit on Wednesday, October 17th at 6 pm. Come out with your family and/or a friend to enjoy a delicious dinner featuring produce from UK CSA and beer pairings from West Sixth.

Be sure to reserve your tickets by following this link here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/honeywood-south-farm-series-west-sixth-beer-dinner-tickets-50701387214

CSA Newsletter Week 21, October 11th

Farm Notes

This week has been a busy one for us out here at the farm. We are still in the process of taking down fields and preparing them for cover crops for the winter. We also got the first of our 2019 fields put in…the garlic field! We have yet to lay one more field of plastic for the 2019 onions. Hopefully the weather will cooperate over the next few weeks and the soil will be dry enough to get that bed in. It may seem like everything is slowing down, but there is still SO much more to do!

The apple sales have been such a success for the Horticulture club that they have SOLD OUT! So no more apple sales. Thank you all for your support of the Horticulture club and be sure to follow them on Instagram and Facebook for information about their plant sales. They have loads of Kentucky Native plants, houseplants and so much more!

Don’t forget to sign up for our Fall CSA and/or a Thanksgiving box! You can sign up for either via this google docs form. Also, if you are interested in signing up for either, you may do so at the CAMPUS pick-up today from 4-6pm.

The UK Winery will be set up on campus this Thursday from 4-6pm, with the CSA. They will also be at the Farm pick-up location from 3:30-6:30pm. You may also purchase wine from them on Fridays at the farm in the classroom building from 2-6pm. Check out their blog site, ukywine.com for more information on wine varieties and prices.

Note from an Apprentice

This week’s note is from Daniel Scotton.

Hello, my name is Daniel Scotton, and I’m a Sustainable Ag student from North Carolina. Though I grew up on a family farm, my parents are full-time veterinarians which has always taken up a large portion of their days. Still, as a child I fondly remember our vegetable garden beds, picking blackberries and grapes and working cattle. If we wanted to make burgers we simply went out to the freezer in our barn and could grab some tomatoes and lettuce on the walk back. Depending on the day though, my family’s diet could swing from processed or takeout one night to entirely home-cooked and local the next. This contrast at mealtimes never really occurred to me back then, probably because it never took much effort from myself! My mother was always the cook of the family, and though we all helped, we were content to be a sideshow to her performance. Whether we were cooking or eating out, it was always a group effort that my mother would spearhead.

Moving to Kentucky for college changed that, and I became suddenly aware of just how difficult and expensive eating can be without skill at cooking. Responsible for my own meals, I’m sure my roommate for my first year at UK got a sobering, up-close glimpse at my eating habits! In the absence of a private kitchen and armed with a UK meal plan, it was all too convenient to grab some fast food or hit up a dining hall for all the goodies I could want. When, after the first year I rented an apartment with some friends, I had the time and energy to start preparing my own meals to be healthier and save money. Bit by bit, and with no small quantity of advice from home, I began meal planning and experimenting some to see what dishes I could make.

I was excited to take part in the apprenticeship this summer, and the reality has more than surpassed my expectations. After weeding garden beds by hand for years at home, it’s pretty remarkable the kind of weed control we achieve at South Farm. Seeing firsthand the ways to reduce hand-labor such as with the stale seed bed technique and the automated finger weeder has greatly inspired me and given me ideas on how to manage the family garden back home. My meals over the summer benefited hugely from the incredible lunches that staff members would volunteer to make, as well as the variety of fresh vegetables that apprentices were allowed to pilfer when there was extra. Planting and harvesting such a diverse array of crops has certainly expanded my horizons on vegetables (I’m looking at you, kohlrabi), and given me renewed admiration for both the people who grow vegetables and the people who cook them.

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Wet, muddy, happy beet harvest.

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Daniel is on the far right.

What’s In Your Share

For this week, you’ll receive:
+ Potatoes
+ Napa Cabbage
+ Broccoli
+ Kale
+ Mixed Chioggia and Gold Beets
+ Bok Choy for Campus and Spinach for Farm (there wasn’t enough of both to give out this week)

Farm Stand

The CSA Farm Stand (which is for purchasing “extras”) will be set up at both the campus (from 4-6pm) and farm (from 3:30-6:30pm) locations. Items available will be on a first come, first served basis. For the campus location, we will be set up a little differently this year. The Farm Stand will be located all the way to the right of the pick-up line with it’s own tent and table. So please do not go through the regular pick-up line to buy a la carte.  At the farm, the Farm Stand table will also be set up separately from the regular pick-up line. We accept cash, check and *NEW* this year, credit cards.

Items Available for Purchase this Week:
+ Purple Potatoes: $4.50/bag
+ Napa Cabbage: $2 each
+ Broccoli: $2/head
+ Kale: $3/bunch
+ Beets: $3/lb.
+ Bok Choy: $2 each (CAMPUS ONLY)

You-Pick

As mentioned in the preview this week, Friday, October 12th is the last day for you-pick.

Items available:
+ Flowers
+ Herbs
+ Hot Peppers
+ What’s left of the cherry tomatoes
+ We have a perennial herb bed, right to the west of the You-Pick field. Most of the herbs are the same as what is in You-Pick, however many are more mature, such as the sage, chives and oregano. There is also spearmint in the perennial bed.

Veggie Tips (or Facts)

+ The variety of potatoes this week are a “buff” skin type. Either Nicola or Kennebec. Basically these are just a white flesh potato with a tan skin. These potatoes work great boiled, fried, mashed, steamed or in salads. They hold their shape pretty well after cooking. Store potatoes in a cool, dark and dry place. They will last for several weeks.

+ Napa Cabbage is a type of Chinese cabbage that is an excellent ingredient in stir fries. You can store Napa cabbage wrapped in a moist towel in the crisper drawer of the fridge for about 3-4 weeks.

+ Broccoli stores best in the crisper drawer of the fridge. Use it within the week for best flavor and freshness.

+ Kale, like all leafy greens, store best in a perforated bag in the crisper drawer of the fridge. Most kale is best within the week, but in optimal storage conditions, it can last for several weeks.

+ This week’s beets are the roots only. Chioggia is a pink skinned variety with candy cane-like stripes on the inside. Golden beets are just what they sound. Beets store best in the crisper drawer of the fridge. As with most root crops, beets will store anywhere from about a week, up to a few months.

+ (CAMPUS) Bok Choy is another type of Chinese cabbage that is also great for stir fries. Store your bok choy like you would the Napa cabbage: in the crisper drawer of the fridge. It should keep for about the same amount of time.

+ (FARM) Spinach stores best in the bag you received it in and in the crisper drawer of the fridge. It will keep for about a week.

View this post on Instagram

I spy…!!! Finally.

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Recipes

For your convenience this week’s recipes in a printable format.

Meal Plan Menu

Thursday:

Roasted Napa Cabbage

From Food.com

Ingredients:
6 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 garlic cloves, crushed
6 cups napa cabbage, roughly shredded
salt, to taste
pepper, to taste

Directions:
Heat the oil in a skillet on low; add the garlic cloves and cook very gently for 15 minutes. Discard the garlic and toss the cabbage with the oil, salt and pepper.
Preheat your oven to 450°. Place the cabbage on a baking sheet and bake for about 15 minutes or until the tops of the cabbage pieces are browned. Serve hot.

Friday:

Broccoli Sausage Pasta

Ingredients:
1 lb turkey italian sausage
1 lb broccoli
1 box shaped pasta
1 onion
as much garlic as you can stand
Toasted Pine nuts
Parmesan Cheese
Chicken Stock
Red Pepper flakes

Directions:
Saute onion and garlic in pan until softened. Add sausage and saute until browned. At the same time, blanch the broccoli in boiling water and drain and cook pasta in boiling water until Al dente. Once Broccoli is done add it to the sausage mixture along with crushed red pepper flakes to taste. Add small amount of chicken or vegatable stock to moisten the “sauce”. Place a good amount of pasta on plate, add shaved parmesan, add “sauce”. Add more parmesan and toasted pine nuts.

Saturday:

Roasted Beets with Tart Pink Grapefruit Glaze

From The Vegetable Dishes I Can’t Live Without by Mollie Katzen

Ingredients:
3 pounds beets
1 cup fresh-squeezed pink grapefruit juice
1 Tbs unseasoned rice vinegar
2 Tbs plus 2 tsp real maple syrup
1 Tbs cornstarch

Directions:
Trim greens from beets, wrap whole beets in foil with about 3 Tbs water tossed in.  Roast in oven for 1 hour or until tender.  Let beets cool, remove and discard remaining stems and rub off the skins.  Cut into thin slices.

Whisk together grapefruit juice, vinegar and maple syrup. Place cornstarch in a saucepan and drizzle grapefruit mixture until all cornstarch is dissolved.  Place saucepan over medium heat and heat just to the boiling point whisking frequently.  Turn heat down and cook, stirring often, for about 3-5 minutes until thick and glossy.  Remove from the heat.

Drizzle hot glaze over the hot, warm, or room temperature roasted beets, and serve.

Sunday:

Stir-Fried Bok Choy with Ginger and Garlic

Ingredients:
1 tbsp. olive oil
2 cloves of garlic, minced
1 tbsp. minced fresh ginger
8 cups chopped, fresh bok choy
2 tbsp. reduced-sodium soy sauce
salt and ground black pepper

Directions:
Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add garlic and ginger and cook 1 minute. Add bok choy and soy sauce cook 3 to 5 minutes, until greens are wilted and stalks are crisp-tender. Season, to taste, with salt and black pepper.

+++

Spinach Braised with Soy and Ginger

Ingredients:
2 Tbsp sesame oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 Tbsp ginger, grated
1 Tbsp soy sauce
1 bunch spinach

Directions:
Skip the butter. Put 2 tablespoons sesame oil in a large saucepan, along with 2 cloves minced garlic, 1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger and 1 tablespoon soy sauce. Add spinach and braise until completely wilted and soft, about 10 minutes.

Monday:

Kale and Potato Soup

From Alice Waters’ Chez Panisse Vegetables

This recipe is SO simple. Feel free to enrich the basic ingredients with other vegetables and herbs. She recommends to stew shallots and garlic separately and then purée them with the kale and potatoes at the end.

“A Portuguese recipe, called caldo verde (green broth) in Portugal, where cabbage is often substituted for the kale.”

Ingredients:
1 bunch kale
2 pounds potatoes
2 quarts water (or chicken/vegetable broth)
1 teaspoon salt
Optional: 1 garlic sausage
Extra virgin olive oil

Directions:
Remove stems from kale, wash the leaves, and cut them into a chiffonade. Peel the potatoes and chop them up very fine. Bring the water to a boil with the salt. Add the chopped potatoes, return to a boil, and cook for 2 minutes, covered. Add the kale and cook 2 minutes more. Taste for seasoning. If desired, serve with sliced garlic sausage heated briefly in the soup and a splash of the olive oil. You can also serve it as a purée, moisten it with chicken stock or enrich it with other vegetables.

Tuesday:

Cheesy Potato Cakes

By Whit Widdowson

Ingredients:
1 1/2 cups grated raw potatoes
1 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1 cup leftover mashed potatoes
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 egg
2 tablespoons ranch dressing
1 tablespoon milk
2 tablespoons vegetable oil

Directions:
Prep 
15 min.
Cook
 10 min.
Ready In
 25 min

Mix grated potatoes with flour in a large bowl. Stir Cheddar cheese and mashed potatoes into the grated potato mixture; season with salt and pepper. Beat egg, ranch dressing, and milk together in a separate bowl; pour mixture into potatoes and stir. Heat vegetable in a large skillet over medium heat. Drop tablespoon size scoops of the potato mixture into the hot oil. Pan-fry until golden brown, 3 to 4 minutes on each side.

Wednesday:  

Leftovers day! Clean out that fridge for new vegetables coming Thursday.

Preview Week 21

Happy Monday! For once, it is dry, but anyone else a little flabbergasted by the 85 degree temps in *October*? It has certainly been an unusual weather year. In September, our cumulative rainfall was 10.85 inches!!! In the past 5 years the cumulative rainfall was at its highest around 4 inches. So to say the rain in 2018 has been unusual is, if anything, an understatement… it was record-setting. This late heat and prolific rains has compromised some of our crops. We are *hoping* broccoli will be in the shares this week and next.  *Crossing our fingers.*  Just needs to cool off a little bit to get some nice heads.

Friday will be our LAST DAY FOR YOU-PICK. The You Pick field will close at 4pm on Friday October 12th. Come grab your last batch of hot peppers, herbs, and flowers before then!

Preview for Week 21 shares:

+ Potatoes

+ Kale

+ Another leafy green… lettuce or spinach most likely

+ Gold and Chioggia Beets

+ Napa Cabbage

After this week, we have ONE MORE week in our main CSA season!! The LAST pick up is Thursday October 18th.

Our Fall CSA program kicks off on Thursday October 25th! It is not too late to sign up. We ask you to commit to the first 4 weeks for $60, payment due at first day of pick up. We will take a week off of the CSA to do a special Thanksgiving Box delivery on Tuesday November 20th. (Pre-order boxes now!) Then — hopefully — we will continue the CSA veggies for another 4 weeks for another $60 through December 20th. This second 4 weeks is experimental for us.  We are excited and hopeful to have some good veggies to carry us into the winter months.

Sign Up Here!!

Thanks for your support.  Questions? Just let us know! Come talk to a staff member on site at pick up this week or send us an email at uk.csa@uky.edu

CSA Newsletter Week 20, October 4th

Farm Notes

Even though the fields are still wet from all the rain we had last week, we have still been able to accomplish a lot over the last few days. We’ve harvested a few more beds of sweet potatoes, harvested for the share this week and pulled some drip tape up out of several beds in preparation for turning the field over into cover crops for the winter. Hopefully by Friday, the fields will have dried out even more so that we can get some much needed weeding done and some planting!

Don’t forget to sign up for our Fall CSA and/or a Thanksgiving box! You can sign up for either via this google docs form. Also, if you are interested in signing up for either, you may do so at the CAMPUS pick-up today from 4-6pm.

The University of Kentucky Horticulture Club will be on CAMPUS during distribution time (4-6pm) selling apples. They have a wide array of varieties. Please note that these apples are NOT organic; they were grown on the conventional side of UK South Farm. Apples are $0.50 each, or $10 for a 1/4 bushel. The Hort Club accepts cash, check or Venmo.

The UK Winery will be set up on campus this Thursday from 4-6pm, with the CSA. They will also be at the Farm pick-up location from 3:30-6:30pm. You may also purchase wine from them on Fridays at the farm in the classroom building from 2-6pm. Check out their blog site, ukywine.com for more information on wine varieties and prices.

What’s In Your Share

For this week, you’ll receive:
+ Honeynut Squash
+ Onions
+ Carrots
+ Sweet Potatoes
+ Romaine Lettuce Head
+ Turnips OR Radishes
+ Chard OR Kale (extremely limited quantities of kale)
+ Cilantro

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Morning romaine harvest. #conveyorstrong

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Farm Stand

The CSA Farm Stand (which is for purchasing “extras”) will be set up at both the campus (from 4-6pm) and farm (from 3:30-6:30pm) locations. Items available will be on a first come, first served basis. For the campus location, we will be set up a little differently this year. The Farm Stand will be located all the way to the right of the pick-up line with it’s own tent and table. So please do not go through the regular pick-up line to buy a la carte.  At the farm, the Farm Stand table will also be set up separately from the regular pick-up line. We accept cash, check and *NEW* this year, credit cards.

Items Available for Purchase this Week:
+ Honeynut Squash: $1.25 each
+ Chard: $2/bunch
+ Onions: $0.50 each
+ Carrots: $3/bag
+ Sweet Potatoes: $11.25/4.5 lb. bag
+ Romaine Lettuce: $3/head
+ Radishes: $2/carton
+ Turnips: $2/bag
+ Cilantro: $2/bunch
+ Kale: $3/bunch

You-Pick

+ Every week that there is you-pick available we will list what is available in the weekly newsletter. The first time you come to the farm we ask that you find one of the organic team (in the organic shed or out in the fields) for a you-pick orientation.

+ You will need to bring your own harvest containers and – if you are interested in okra or flowers – your own pruners or scissors.  All you-pick crops will also be marked in the field with a “you-pick” sign. In 2018 the main you-pick field is located south of the parking lot towards Waveland Museum Road, but close to the farm’s access road.

+ We ask that you park your vehicle in the parking lot and walk to the you-pick area to keep vehicles out of our fields. However, if you require assistance to get to our fields or if there is an issue of accessibility, we can make exceptions but please talk to a staff member first for guidelines.

You-Pick Hours:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday  – 7:30am until 4pm
Thursday – 7am until 6:30pm

We are closed on all major holidays including Memorial Day, 4th of July, and Labor Day.
+ Please only pick from the beds that have a sign saying “You-Pick”. Not everything is ready or available to pick at this time.

Items available:
+ You-pick is slowing waaaayyyyy down.
+ Flowers
+ Herbs
+ Hot Peppers
+ What’s left of the cherry tomatoes
+ We have a perennial herb bed, right to the west of the You-Pick field. Most of the herbs are the same as what is in You-Pick, however many are more mature, such as the sage, chives and oregano. There is also spearmint in the perennial bed.

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These purple top turnips look like gems! 😍

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Veggie Tips (or Facts)

+ Honeynut Squash looks just like a miniature version of the butternut squash, but it is OH SO SWEET! Check out this Bon Appétit article on how the honeynut came to be for an interesting little back story.  Honeynut Squash should be stored in a single layer on a kitchen counter or someplace cool. Room temperature is also fine. You can expect your squash to last about a month, but if you wish to prolong it’s shelf-stability, you can wipe the skin with a damp cloth and dish soap or a 1 part bleach in 10 parts water to prevent decay. Make sure to fully dry the squash. Most all winter squashes are interchangeable in recipes. Instead of baking your honeynut, try roasting it. The high heat will caramelize the insides and you won’t need to add any brown sugar or maple syrup to this! You can even eat the skin as it is thin skinned like the delicata squash.

+++

How to Roast Honeynut Squash:

Ingredients:
2 honeynut squash, exterior washed and dried
1 to 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Fine sea salt, to taste
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Directions:
Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C) and line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.
Using a sharp knife, halve the squash lengthwise (stem to base). To cut lengthwise, start the cut in the center of the squash and cut towards the base (while securely holding the opposite end). Rotate the squash and again, start in the center but this time cut towards and through the stem. (If the squash it too difficult to cut through, see recipe notes below.)
Using a spoon, scoop out and discard the seeds and pulpy insides.
Drizzle the cut side of the squash halves with oil or use a brush to apply a thin layer.
Season with a generous sprinkle of fine sea salt and freshly ground black pepper or to
taste.
With the honeynut squash halves cut side face down, roast for 20 to 25 minutes or until a fork can easily pierce through the skin to the fleshy inside. Remove from the oven and carefully flip the squash halves over, lifting from the top half of the squash. The sides along the base (or fashioned bowl) will be the most fragile. Serve immediately (or see recipe notes on how to store and reheat).
To Enjoy: Using a fork, dig into the fleshy inside. Don’t worry if you find yourself scraping all the goodness down to the skin. Totally acceptable!

+++

+ Sweet potatoes store very similar to potatoes. Store them in a cool, dry and dark place. Avoid storing them in the fridge or any place cooler than 50F. Sweet potatoes will store anywhere from 4-6 months.

+ Lettuce and other greens like chard store best in the crisper drawer of the fridge in a plastic bag. Lettuce will store for about a week, possibly two. Chard will store for about a week.

+ The yellow onions may be stored anywhere that provides good air circulation and is cool. Expect your onions to last a couple of weeks, up to several weeks and/or months.

+ Carrots and other root crops such as the turnips and radishes store best in a perforated plastic bag in the crisper drawer of the fridge. Each of these root crops will store for several weeks. If you notice your roots have become limp, you can place them in a jar or container of cold water and place back in the fridge. In a few hours, the roots should have firmed back up again.

+ Cilantro stores best with the cut ends placed in a jar or container with an inch or two of water in the fridge. Replace the water daily. Cilantro should last for about a week, stored in this way.

Recipes

For your convenience this week’s recipes in a printable format.

Meal Plan Menu

Thursday:

Grilled Romaine

From foodnetwork.com

Ingredients:
2 heads romaine lettuce
Extra-virgin olive oil
Citrus Caesar Vinaigrette, recipe follows
Parmigiano-Reggiano

Citrus Caesar Vinaigrette:
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tablespoon grated lemon zest
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice (from 1 to 2 lemons)
2 tablespoons anchovy paste
1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
2/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Directions:
Preheat a grill to medium-high.

Rinse and pat dry the lettuce. Cut the 2 heads in half lengthwise. Brush surface with olive oil and grill about 4 to 5 minutes total, turning occasionally. Place each wedge on a salad plate and drizzle with Citrus Caesar Vinaigrette or your favorite Caesar dressing. With a vegetable peeler, shave some pieces from a wedge of Reggiano-Parmigiano over each salad and serve.

Citrus Caesar Vinaigrette:
Place all ingredients in a pint jar with a lid. Secure the lid, then shake to blend. Store, covered, in the refrigerator for up to a week.

Friday:

Fall Vegetable Stir Fry

Submitted by apprentice Cheryl Kastanowski, adapted from Harmony Valley

Ingredients:
5 c. cooked spaghetti or other noodles
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 large onion, or equivalen, minced

(Saute vegetable ingredients are all optional and variable.)
Hard vegetables:
Broccoli, chopped into bite-sized pieces
Carrots, sliced into discs

Greens:
Yukina savoy, roughly chopped
Chard, roughly chopped

Protein:
Chicken or fried tofu slices, optional (I used 1/2 pkg. of firm tofu, sliced and fried.)

Stir fry sauce ingredients:
1/4 c. soy sauce
1 1/4 c. water
1 Tbsp. fresh ginger, minced
1 tsp sesame oil
2 Tbsp. dry wine (optional)
3 Tbsp. cornstarch

Directions:
1. Heat 1 Tbsp. oil over medium heat in a large skillet.
2. Once oil is hot, add onion and garlic. Stir-fry for 2 minutes. Meanwhile, combine stir fry sauce ingredients except for cornstarch.
3. Add hard vegetables. Turn heat up to high. Cook until vegetables began to get tender, stirring frequently.
4. Add greens one handful at a time, stirring until they just start to wilt before adding the next handful.
5. Mix 3 Tbsp. cornstarch with 3 Tbsp. water and then add to stir fry sauce. Add sauce to stir-fried veggies and stir to let thicken, about 1 minute.
6. Add cooked spaghetti/noodles and heat through.

Saturday:

Sweet Potato and Black Bean Chili

Ingredients:
1 tbsp. olive oil
2 lbs. sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/4 inch cubes
1 red bell pepper, chopped
1 green bell pepper, chopped
1 onion, chopped
1 tbsp. minced garlic
6 cups chicken broth (or vegetable broth)
2 (15 oz.) cans black beans, rinsed and drained
2 (14.5 oz.) cans fire-roasted diced tomatoes
1 tbsp. ground cumin
1 tsp. dried, crushed oregano
1 tsp. ground chipotle chile pepper
1 tsp. salt
1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
Toppings: fresh cilantro and lime wedges

Directions:
In a large dutch oven, heat oil over medium high heat. Add sweet potatoes and next 4 ingredients. Cook, stirring frequently for 10 minutes. Add broth and next 6 ingredients; bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 35 minutes or until potatoes are tender and chili is slightly thickened. Stir in cilantro. Serve with fresh cilantro and lime wedges.

Sunday:

Savory Stuffed Honeynut Squash

Ingredients:
3 honey nut squash
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 pinch salt
FOR THE STUFFING
1 cup quinoa, farro or a blend, cooked at room temperature
1 medium onion diced
2 cloves garlic minced
8 ounces mushrooms fresh, finely diced
1 teaspoon thyme fresh
1/2 teaspoon sage dried, crumbled
2 cups kale leaves only, tough stems removed, finely chopped (OR CHARD!)
1/4 cup vegetable broth
1 tablespoon olive oil
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg freshly grated
3/4 cup Parmigiano Reggiano freshly grated
FOR TOPPING
1 teaspoon butter
1 slice bread; I used potato bread, but sourdough or plain white bread work fine too

Directions:
Preheat the oven to 400°. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

Cut the squash in half, vertically and scoop out the seeds. Drizzle the cut side with olive oil and rub it into the flesh. Sprinkle with salt and place the squash cut-side-down onto the baking sheet. Roast for 20 minutes.

Meanwhile in a medium skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat and add the onions and garlic. Saute for 2-3 minutes then stir in the chopped mushrooms, thyme, sage and salt, cook until the mushrooms release their liquid, about 5 minutes. Stir in the chopped kale and vegetable broth, cover and reduce heat to a simmer for 3-4 minutes until kale softens. Stir in the pepper, nutmeg and the cooked grains. Add the parmigiano reggiano and stir until just combined.

Tear the bread into large pieces and transfer to a mini prep food processor. Add the butter and pulse several times until it forms bread crumbs.

When the squash is done, fill the cavities with the stuffing and sprinkle with breadcrumbs and bake for an additional 10 minutes. If the breadcrumbs need additional browning, turn on the broiler and cook just until the breadcrumbs start to brown, (about a minute or two).

Monday:

Roasted Watermelon Radishes

From myrecipes.com

Ingredients:
1 lb. watermelon radishes, trimmed
3 tbsp. olive oil, divided
1 tsp. coarse sea salt

Directions:
Preheat oven to 375°. Cut radishes into wedges. Mix with 2 tbsp. oil and put in a 2-qt. baking dish. Roast radishes, stirring occasionally, until fork tender, about 1 hour. Drizzle with remaining 1 tbsp. oil and sprinkle with sea salt.

+++

Julienned Turnips with Savory

From Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone

Ingredients:
1 1/2-2 pounds turnips, peeled and julienned
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 Tbsp butter
1 Tbsp olive or canola oil
1 tsp finely minced savory or 1/2 t dried
1 Tbsp chopped parsley

Directions:
Sprinkle the turnips lightly with salt and set aside in a colander for 30 minutes.  Squeeze out the excess moisture.  Warm the butter and oil in a skillet over medium heat.  Add the turnips and savory.  Cook gently, stirring occasionally, until tender, 12-15 minutes.  Add the parsley, taste for salt, season with pepper, and toss again before serving.

Tuesday:

African Sweet Potato Stew

From Recipes from the Root Cellar by Andrea Chesman

Ingredients:
2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 onion, diced
4 garlic cloves, minced
1 1-inch piece of ginger, peeled and minced
1 tsp cumin seeds
1/2 tsp crushed red pepper flakes
3 cups water
2 large sweet potatoes, peeled and diced
4-6 cups chopped greens (peel and discard any tough stems)
1 1/2 cups cooked chickpeas
1 1/2 cups diced tomatoes with juice
1 cup roasted peanuts
3 Tbsp natural unsweetened peanut butter
Salt and Pepper
Hot cooked rice, for serving
Hot sauce, for serving.

Directions:
Heat the oil in a large saucepan over medium high heat. Add the onion, garlic, ginger, cumin and red pepper flakes and saute until the onion is softened, about 3 minutes. Add the water, sweet potatoes, greens, chickpeas, tomatoes and peanuts. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer, covered, until the sweet potatoes are tender, 15-20 minutes. Stir in the peanut butter. Season with salt and pepper and serve over rice.

Wednesday:  

Leftovers day! Clean out that fridge for new vegetables coming Thursday.

Preview Week 20

Week 20! Wow, just 3 more share pick ups for our main CSA season. But don’t worry — we will still have more veggies this fall…  Pre-order your Thanksgiving Boxes and/or Sign up for our FALL CSA right here.

We are sorry for this late preview for week 20. I don’t know if anyone caught it, but our crew was featured on UK Now last week about the new UK Dining local food initiatives. We are providing a few select veggies for UK Dining, and underwent our third party GAP audit today. GAP stands for Good Agricultural Practices. (Incase you’re wondering, we got a perfect score!) Check out the full article here.

Now, about those veggies!

Week 20 Preview:

+ Sweet Potatoes! At long last.

+ Romaine lettuce heads

+ Honeynut Squash. These petite squashes have gained popularity for their absurd sweetness. Also, the cute factor. Just wait till you see them.

+ Carrots

+ Chard

+ Onions

CSA Newsletter Week 19, September 27th

Farm Notes

I hope everyone has stayed safe and dry over these past few days of rain! Hopefully today will stay nice and cool AND dry.  Just kidding, as I’m updating the newsletter, it’s begun to rain again. Maybe it will hold off for pick-up this afternoon….

It really is starting to feel like fall out at the farm. Fields are getting cleaned up, summer crops are ending. And the cool season crops are starting to roll in. Last Friday, we started harvesting sweet potatoes. So far, the sizes seem much more reasonable, as opposed to our notoriously monstrous sizes in the past. Be sure to keep reading the rest of the newsletter….we’ve got a note from an apprentice this week!

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Preview of upcoming shares…!

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The University of Kentucky Horticulture Club will be on CAMPUS during distribution time (4-6pm) selling apples. They have a wide array of varieties. Please note that these apples are NOT organic; they were grown on the conventional side of UK South Farm. Apples are $0.50 each, or $10 for a 1/4 bushel. I believe the Hort Club accepts cash, check or Venmo.

The UK Winery will be set up on campus this Thursday from 4-6pm, with the CSA. They will also be at the Farm pick-up location from 3:30-6:30pm. You may also purchase wine from them on Fridays at the farm in the classroom building from 2-6pm. Check out their blog site, ukywine.com for more information on wine varieties and prices.

Note from an Apprentice

This week’s note is from Josh LeCompte.

Hey UK CSA, my name is Joshua LeCompte and I’m currently a senior majoring in Sustainable Agriculture here at the University of Kentucky. I was born in Frankfort, Kentucky and have lived around KY my whole life.  As a kid I was commonly fed processed meals and fast food as my mother was a single mom with little time and a lack of education on the value of quality food. When we did have prepared meals, meat was the main staple and the foods consisted of lower quality, high fat and greasy options. Soda was a common staple as the drink of choice. As I grew and began sports, I transitioned over to water first and noticed quite a difference in how I felt. I also grew leaner and less lethargic. Then, as a college student I had a dear friend who was a devout vegetarian. As we shared more meals I naturally began to eat more as they did and noticed a drastic difference in how I felt. Cutting out red meat and high fat/processed foods (for the most part) eliminated a good share of fatigue and felt like it brought higher mental clarity and better general health.

Through this friend I also gained a deeper interest into what I was consuming and how it not only impacted myself but also the environment around me. I began to broadly explore the impacts of conventional/organic practices, the importance of understanding seasonality when it comes to produce and how supporting local farmers helps the economy and the environment by reducing emissions. I would occasionally help this friend with her garden sparking a deeper appreciation for what it takes to actually produce food and bringing to light how skewed supermarkets can make our understanding of what we’re actually eating. Until this point I would have never realized just how many resources these items took to grow.

As a sustainable agriculture student here at UK, I have had the opportunity to work on a few local organic farms. For the past two summers my job at SaladDays has doubled as a grocery store and during these times I’ve never felt better. Food equals health and the value of sustainable locally grown seasonal produce is invaluable. My experience at SaladDays has vastly expanded my understanding of the many hats a farmer must wear to be successful, as a farmer’s job is never done. There are always records to be kept, markets to investigate, planning of rotations, seeding and preparation for ensuing seasons. As a part of this crew I also glimpsed the aspects of community that growing food with others naturally brings and have been able to practically apply knowledge I’ve gained throughout my coursework.

This past summer I had the privilege to be an apprentice at South Farm. Working with the UK crew was a great way to examine how scale and modes of efficiency could differ from my previous farming experience. Getting to experience the different transplanters, the conveyor, harvesters and various weeding methods expanded how I saw SaladDays and allowed me to firsthand develop and apply ways to integrate them there. I also gained more outside knowledge that will lend itself to my future farming experiences with how to operate multiple tractors, beekeeping and honey extraction, plant pathology and irrigation being a few. This apprenticeship lengthened my understanding of community through the many people I managed to meet and share stories, food and hard work alongside. Payment comes in many forms and experiences such as these shared with others is one of the highest rewards.

Josh is in the forefront of the photo.

What’s In Your Share

For this week, you’ll receive:
+ Butternut Squash
+ Lettuce Head
+ Arugula
+ Purple Potatoes
+ Garlic
+ Kale OR Collards
+ Beets
+ Green Tomatoes
+ Mixed Sweet Peppers

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Wet harvest in the arugula field.

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Farm Stand

The CSA Farm Stand (which is for purchasing “extras”) will be set up at both the campus (from 4-6pm) and farm (from 3:30-6:30pm) locations. Items available will be on a first come, first served basis. For the campus location, we will be set up a little differently this year. The Farm Stand will be located all the way to the right of the pick-up line with it’s own tent and table. So please do not go through the regular pick-up line to buy a la carte.  At the farm, the Farm Stand table will also be set up separately from the regular pick-up line. We accept cash, check and *NEW* this year, credit cards.

Items Available for Purchase this Week:
+ Butternut Squash: $3 each
+ Lettuce Head: $3 each
+ Arugula: $5/bag
+ Purple Potatoes: $4.50/bag
+ Garlic: $1.50/bulb
+ Kale: $3/bunch
+ Collards: $3/bunch
+ Beets: $3/bunch
+ Sweet Peppers: $1 each

You-Pick

+ Every week that there is you-pick available we will list what is available in the weekly newsletter. The first time you come to the farm we ask that you find one of the organic team (in the organic shed or out in the fields) for a you-pick orientation.

+ You will need to bring your own harvest containers and – if you are interested in okra or flowers – your own pruners or scissors.  All you-pick crops will also be marked in the field with a “you-pick” sign. In 2018 the main you-pick field is located south of the parking lot towards Waveland Museum Road, but close to the farm’s access road.

+ We ask that you park your vehicle in the parking lot and walk to the you-pick area to keep vehicles out of our fields. However, if you require assistance to get to our fields or if there is an issue of accessibility, we can make exceptions but please talk to a staff member first for guidelines.

You-Pick Hours:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday  – 7:30am until 4pm
Thursday – 7am until 6:30pm

We are closed on all major holidays including Memorial Day, 4th of July, and Labor Day.
+ Please only pick from the beds that have a sign saying “You-Pick”. Not everything is ready or available to pick at this time.

Items available:
+ Flowers
+ Herbs
+ Hot Peppers
+ Cherry Tomatoes are slowing down
+ We have a perennial herb bed, right to the west of the You-Pick field. Most of the herbs are the same as what is in You-Pick, however many are more mature, such as the sage, chives and oregano. There is also spearmint in the perennial bed.

Veggie Tips (or Facts)

+ Butternut Squash should be stored in a single layer on a kitchen counter or someplace cool. Room temperature is also fine. You can expect your squash to last about a month, but if you wish to prolong it’s shelf-stability, you can wipe the skin with a damp cloth and dish soap or a 1 part bleach in 10 parts water to prevent decay. Make sure to fully dry the squash. Most all winter squashes are interchangeable in recipes.

How to bake your winter squash: Place each side, cut side down, in an oven-proof dish filled with about an inch of water. Bake in the oven at 350F for 30 minutes or until the flesh is tender when pierced with a fork. After cooling, you can scoop the flesh out and freeze it for later use or use it in soups, stews or baking.

+ The variety of potatoes this week are called Purple Majesty. These potatoes have both a purple skin and flesh that remains firm and moist after cooking. As the purple color suggests, these potatoes have high levels of antioxidants in them. Use these potatoes for chips, salads, roasting, baking, mashing or microwaving. You can store potatoes in a cool, dark and dry area for a couple of weeks, even up to several months.

+ Lettuce and other greens like arugula, kale and collards store best in the crisper drawer of the fridge in a plastic bag. Expect the more delicate greens, like the lettuce and arugula, to last about a week and the hardier greens, like kale and collards, to last about a couple of weeks.

+ The garlic has already been processed. Store it in a mesh bag or dish on the kitchen counter. It will last for several weeks, up to several months.

+ The beets this week come with their greens attached! Be sure to check the recipe section below for a recipe including the greens. While beets store best as roots without their greens, you can still keep the greens as you would any other green like kale, lettuce or collards. Store the roots in a perforated plastic bag in the crisper drawer of the fridge for a week, up to a few months. Store the greens separate, wrapped in a towel in a plastic bag in the crisper drawer of the fridge. You can expect the greens to last about 2-5 days.

+ Green Tomatoes can be stored like ripe, red tomatoes. Tomatoes store best in a single layer, shoulder side down on the kitchen counter. If you choose to keep your tomatoes in the hopes of ripening them, you do not need to change your storage conditions. The most rapid ripening conditions occur between 60F and 70F. It will take several days to ripen.

+ All peppers can either be stored in a cool place in the kitchen, or in the crisper drawer of the fridge. Peppers may last up to 2 weeks.

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Wet, muddy, happy beet harvest.

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Recipes

For your convenience this week’s recipes in a printable format.

Meal Plan Menu

Thursday:

If you’ve got fennel left from last week, add that to a salad, plus you could chop peppers, or shred beets for added flavor and color.

Tiffany’s Dressing Recipe

50% olive oil (1/3 cup usually)
50% apple cider vinegar (1/3 cup usually)
~1-2 T soy sauce
~1-2 T tahini
Garlic (1-2 cloves?) and lemon juice (1 T?) to taste
—the official bottle calls for toasted sesame seeds, parsley, and chives which I usually don’t add…but would be excellent additions

Friday:

No time? Just buy a frozen pie crust instead of making the crust from scratch. Also, feel free to modify the ingredients. You don’t have to include the bacon and you can add other veggies if you like.

Arugula and Bacon Quiche

Ingredients:
Crust —
1 1/2 cups all purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
6 tablespoons (3/4 stick) chilled unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
3 tablespoons chilled solid vegetable shortening, cut into small pieces
4 tablespoons ice water

Filling —
6 bacon slices, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
1/2 cup chopped shallots
8 ounces arugula, stems trimmed, leaves coarsely chopped (about 5 1/2 cups)
2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar
1 cup whipping cream
3 large eggs
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
3/4 cup shredded Gruyere cheese (about 2 1/2 ounces)

Directions:
For crust: Blend flour and salt in processor. Add butter and shortening. Using on/off turns, process until mixture resembles coarse meal. Mix in enough ice water to form moist clumps. Gather dough into ball; flatten into disk. Wrap in plastic and chill until dough is firm enough to roll out, about 30 minutes. Roll out dough on floured surface to 12-inch round. Transfer to 9-inch-diameter tart pan with removable bottom. Trim dough overhang to 1 inch. Fold overhang in and press, forming double-thick high-standing sides. Pierce crust all over with fork. Freeze crust 30 minutes. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and keep frozen.)

Position rack in center of oven and preheat to 400°F. Bake crust until golden brown, piercing with fork if crust bubbles, about 20 minutes. Transfer crust to rack. Reduce temperature to 375°F.

For filling: Cook bacon in heavy medium skillet over medium-high heat until crisp, about 5 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer to paper towels and drain. Add shallots to same skillet and saute until tender, about 2 minutes. Add arugula and saute until just wilted, about 1 minute. Remove from heat. Add balsamic vinegar; toss to combine.

Sprinkle arugula mixture, then bacon over crust. Whisk cream, eggs, salt and pepper in large bowl to blend. Stir in cheese. Pour mixture into crust.

Bake quiche until filling is slightly puffed and golden, about 35 minutes. Let stand 10 minutes. Cut in wedges.

Saturday:

Roasted Beets and Sauteed Greens with Hazelnuts and Goat Cheese

Ingredients:
4-6 small beets, or 2-3 larger betters, tops on
1/4 cup chopped hazelnuts
2-3 large cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons Herb Butter or olive oil
1/2 cup water, stock or white wine, optional
3 tablespoons very cold goat cheese, broken into small pieces
Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

Directions:
Preheat the oven to 350° F.

Remove the beet greens just above where they connect with the beet. Rinse the beets and greens thoroughly. Wrap each beet loosely in foil. Roast for about an hour, until beets are barely soft to touch. When cool enough, remove skin and slice into quarters or eights, depending on size (small bite-sized pieces).

Toast the hazelnuts in a medium sauté pan over medium-high flame, turning constantly, until brown, about 5 minutes. Set nuts aside.

In the same pan over medium flame, melt the butter and sauté the garlic until turning color, about 2-3 minutes. Add the beet greens, stems intact, and sauté until wilted, about 3-5 minutes. If pan gets too dry, add a splash of water, stock, or white wine.

Remove from flame and toss in roasted beet pieces, nuts, salt and pepper. Empty onto serving platter or individual plates and top with bits of cold goat cheese.

Sunday:

Fried Green Tomatoes
From The Practical Produce Cookbook by Ray and Elsie Hoover

Ingredients:
6 medium green tomatoes
2 eggs
1/4 cup milk
1 cup cornmeal, bread crumbs or flour
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. oregano
1/8 tsp. pepper
2 tbsp. butter
1 tbsp. vegetable oil

Directions:
Slice tomatoes into 1/4 to 1/2 inch slices. Beat together eggs and milk. Combine corn meal, salt, oregano and pepper. Heat butter and oil in a skillet. Dip tomato slices in egg mixture then in cornmeal mixture. Fry tomato slices, turning once, until golden brown on both sides.

+++

Green Tomato Chutney

From Simply Recipes
These instructions include instructions for canning the chutney. If you plan on storing in the refrigerator and using up within a few months, you can skip the sterilization and canning steps (steps 1 and 4).

Ingredients:
2 1/2 pounds firm green tomatoes, about 7 cups, cored and chopped
1 1/4 cups brown sugar, packed
1 cup chopped red onion
1 cup golden raisins
1 cup cider vinegar
2 Tbsp chopped candied ginger
1 Tbsp mustard seeds
1 teaspoon chili pepper flakes
1 teaspoon fennel seeds
1 teaspoon of salt
1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
1 cinnamon stick
Pinch of ground nutmeg
3 pint jars or 6 8-ounce jars for canning

Directions:
1. Sterilize the jars and lids. Place a steamer rack in a large (16 quart) pot, and place the jars on the rack. Fill the jars and the pot with water up to the rim of the jars. If you don’t have a rack you can place a clean dish towel at the base of the pot. You want to prevent the glass jars from touching the bottom of the pot which can get quite hot and cause the glass to crack. Put the burner on high and heat until a rolling boil. Boil for 10 minutes. To sterilize the lids, place them in a bowl and pour boiling water over them.

2. Place all of the ingredients in a medium sized (about 4 qt) thick-bottomed pot. Bring to a boil and reduce to a simmer. Cover and cook for 45 minutes. Taste and adjust seasonings.

3. Remove the jars from the pot of hot water (reserving the water if you plan to can for shelf storage.). Scoop the green tomato chutney into the jars, filling them to 1/4 of an inch from the rim. Wipe the rims with a clean wet paper towel. Place sterilized lids on the jars. Secure with canning rings.

4. Place the filled jars back in the pot of hot water. Make sure the jars are covered with an inch of water. Bring to a boil and process for 15 minutes, or 20 minutes if you are at altitudes between 1000 and 6000 feet. Remove the jars from the pot and place on a dish towel spread out on your counter. Allow the jars to cool completely. The jar lids should make a popping sound as they seal. If a lid doesn’t seal for some reason, store the jar in the refrigerator.

Makes 3 Pint-sized jars.

Monday:

Roasted Purple Potatoes with Cilantro and Garlic

Ingredients:
2 1/2 pounds purple potatoes
3 cloves garlic (minced)
Optional: 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
2 teaspoons fresh leaf thyme (or a generous 1/2 teaspoon dried leaf thyme)

Directions:
Heat oven to 400 F (200 C/Gas 6).
Brush a large rimmed baking pan or roasting pan with olive oil or spray the pan with nonstick cooking spray.
Scrub the potatoes well and peel, if desired. Cut the potatoes into 1-inch pieces.
Toss them in a bowl with the minced garlic, fresh chopped cilantro (if using), olive oil, salt, pepper, and thyme.
Arrange the potatoes in a single layer in the prepared pan.
Roast the potatoes for 20 to 25 minutes, or until browned and tender, occasionally turning.

Tuesday:

Try the recipe below with the butternut squash instead. Collards would also work great if you chose that instead of the kale.

Acorn Squash with Kale and Apple

From Farmer John’s Cookbook

Ingredients:
Butter or oil for greasing the pan
3 acorn squash (or similar)
½ cup grated Parmesan cheese, divided
½ tsp salt, divided
½ tsp freshly ground black pepper
1 ½ Tbsp olive oil
1 large leek, chopped (about 2 cups)
4 cups coarsely chopped kale
1 cup vegetable or chicken stock
½ red bell pepper, cored, seeded, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 Tbsp butter
1 apple (or pear) peeled, halved, cored, cut in ½ inch pieces

Directions:
Preheat oven to 375 F.  Lightly grease a 13”x9” pan with butter or oil. Cut squash in half, scoop out seeds and put the squash halves cut-side down on a baking sheet. Bake until tender (30-45 minutes). Turn the squash halves over and sprinkle with ¼ cup Parmesan, ¼ tsp salt and ¼ tsp pepper. Bake for 5 more minutes.  Heat oil in a large skillet over medium high heat.  Add the leeks, sauté until soft, about 5 minutes.  Add the kale, stock, bell pepper, garlic and remaining  ¼ tsp salt and ¼ tsp pepper. Bring to boil, cover and cook for 5 minutes. Remove cover and increase heat to medium-high. Cook, stirring frequently, until kale is tender and the liquid evaporates (8-10 minutes). Transfer mixture to a bowl and set aside.  Melt butter in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the apple, sauté until lightly browned and tender but not mushy, 2 to 3 minutes. Add the apple to kale mixture and stir well. Spoon the kale and apple mixture into the squash halves. Top with the remaining ½ cup Parmesan. Bake for 10 minutes.

+++

Winter Squash and Apple Bake

Author, Tomese Buthod, originally published in Edible Louisville & The Bluegrass Region, November-December 2011 issue.
Topped with a sweetened oatmeal crumb, this can become a dessert.

Ingredients:
2.5-2.75 pound Butternut squash, peeled and seeded, cut into 1/4 inch thick slices or 3/4-inch diced (about 6 cups)
2.25 pound medium-size tart green apples, cored and cut into 1/4-inch thick slices or 3/4-inch diced (about 6 cups)
Salt and freshly ground pepper
3/4 cup mixed raisins and dried cranberries
1/4-1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
3/4 cup real maple syrup
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter, cut into pieces
1 1/2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

Directions:
Preheat oven to 350°F.  Cook squash in large pot of boiling salted water until almost tender, 3-5 minutes.  Drain well.

Combine squash and apples in a 9-by-13-inch baking dish.  Season generously with salt and pepper.

Combine maple syrup, butter, raisins and cranberries, nutmeg and lemon juice in heavy small saucepan.  Whisk over low heat until butter melts.  Pour syrup over squash mixture and toss to coat evenly.

Bake until squash and apples are very tender, stirring occasionally, about 1 hour.  Cool 5 minutes.  (Can be made 1 day ahead.  Cover with foil; chill.  Let come to room temperature before re-warming, covered, in 350°F. oven about 30 minutes.)  Serves 12.

Wednesday:  

Leftovers day! Clean out that fridge for new vegetables coming Thursday.