Preview Week 19 – Fall CSA and Thanksgiving Sign Ups!

The rain is pouring right now, and as farmers, we are wondering if it will ever stop… it certainly has been one of the wettest and most challenging years we have had in a long time.

It is hard to believe that we are entering the last 4 weeks of our main CSA season. The good news is that the veggies won’t stop just because we reach Week 22. We are offering an extended season into the fall for 8 weeks (!!) that will feature smaller share sizes (3-5 items) including fall greens and storage items. The fall CSA will be $15 a week, $120 total for the season. In addition, we are continuing our Thanksgiving Box program to bring a bulk order of veggies at a great value of $35 each to our customers for delivery on Tuesday November 20th.

We are now accepting registrations for the Fall CSA and Thanksgiving Pre-Orders. Membership is limited. Please click here to register.

Or copy and paste this link in your browser: https://goo.gl/forms/pSeBnweK6i3XWQS83

Our Week 19 CSA share for members may include:

+ Purple Potatoes

+ Butternut Squash

+ Lettuce

+ Garlic

+ Arugula

+ Beets

If we’re lucky, some green tomatoes and peppers as well!

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Maiden run with the ganged Jang(s).

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CSA Newsletter Week 18, September 20th

Farm Notes

We hope you all enjoyed the You-Pick Saturday this past weekend. Between the rain earlier this week and staff being ill, we’ve been a little short-staffed and busy trying to get things prepped for the CSA this week. Although the temperature has gone back up, you will get to enjoy some more “Fall” vegetables such as pumpkins, greens and turnips!

Many of you may have noticed last week a group of students with Dr. Keiko Tanaka, asking questions about food waste at the pick-up. From Dr. Tanaka: “Thank you very much for signing up to “Estimating Food Waste within a Kentucky Food Chain,” a study conducted by Drs. David Gonthier (Entomology) and Keiko Tanaka (Community & Leadership Development. Tomorrow, you will receive another “worksheet” (yellow) to track Fennel, Spinach, Tomatoes, and Green beans from tomorrow’s share over the next two weeks (September 20-October 3). The blue worksheet you received last Thursday is used to track only Corn, Peppers, Lettuce/Kale, and Eggplants, which you picked up last week. Please do not mix them with items you pick up this week. If you have any questions about the procedures and study, please contact Dr. Tanaka at ktanaka@uky.edu or (859) 351-9252.”

The UK Winery will be set up on CAMPUS this Thursday from 4-6pm, with the CSA. They will also be at the Farm pick-up location from 3:30-6:30pm. You may also purchase wine from them on Fridays at the farm in the classroom building from 2-6pm. Check out their blog site, ukywine.com for more information on wine varieties and prices.

What’s In Your Share

For this week, you’ll receive:
+ Lettuce Mix
+ Spinach
+ Pie Pumpkins
+ Turnips with greens
+ Fennel bulb
+ Tomatoes
+ Green Beans

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Planted some basil in the solar tunnel.

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Farm Stand

The CSA Farm Stand (which is for purchasing “extras”) will be set up at both the campus (from 4-6pm) and farm (from 3:30-6:30pm) locations. Items available will be on a first come, first served basis. For the campus location, we will be set up a little differently this year. The Farm Stand will be located all the way to the right of the pick-up line with it’s own tent and table. So please do not go through the regular pick-up line to buy a la carte.  At the farm, the Farm Stand table will also be set up separately from the regular pick-up line. We accept cash, check and *NEW* this year, credit cards.

Items Available for Purchase this Week:
+ Lettuce Mix: $5/bag
+ Pie Pumpkins: $3 each
+ Spinach: $3.50/bag
+ Turnips with greens: $3/bunch
+ Tomatoes: $3/lb. *EDIT* NO TOMATOES FOR SALE

You-Pick

+ Every week that there is you-pick available we will list what is available in the weekly newsletter. The first time you come to the farm we ask that you find one of the organic team (in the organic shed or out in the fields) for a you-pick orientation.

+ You will need to bring your own harvest containers and – if you are interested in okra or flowers – your own pruners or scissors.  All you-pick crops will also be marked in the field with a “you-pick” sign. In 2018 the main you-pick field is located south of the parking lot towards Waveland Museum Road, but close to the farm’s access road.

+ We ask that you park your vehicle in the parking lot and walk to the you-pick area to keep vehicles out of our fields. However, if you require assistance to get to our fields or if there is an issue of accessibility, we can make exceptions but please talk to a staff member first for guidelines.

You-Pick Hours:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday  – 7:30am until 4pm
Thursday – 7am until 6:30pm

We are closed on all major holidays including Memorial Day, 4th of July, and Labor Day.
+ Please only pick from the beds that have a sign saying “You-Pick”. Not everything is ready or available to pick at this time.

Items available:
+ Flowers
+ Herbs
+ Hot Peppers
+ Cherry Tomatoes are slowing down
+ We have a perennial herb bed, right to the west of the You-Pick field. Most of the herbs are the same as what is in You-Pick, however many are more mature, such as the sage, chives and oregano. There is also spearmint in the perennial bed.

Veggie Tips (or Facts)

+ Pie pumpkins are another type of winter squash. A lot of winter squash can be used interchangeably in most recipes. An easy way to cook your pumpkin is to slice in half, scoop out the center cavity, saving the seeds if you wish. Place each side, cut side down, in an oven-proof dish filled with about an inch of water. Bake in the oven at 350F for 30 minutes or until the flesh is tender when pierced with a fork. After cooling, you can scoop the flesh out and freeze it for later use or use it in soups, stews or baking. Winter squash should be stored in a single layer on a kitchen counter or someplace cool. Room temperature is also fine. You can expect your squash to last about a month, but if you wish to prolong it’s shelf-stability, you can wipe the skin with a damp cloth and dish soap or a 1 part bleach in 10 parts water to prevent decay. Make sure to fully dry the squash.

+++

How to roast pumpkin seeds:
Wash seeds off and arrange in a flat layer on a paper towel. Pat dry. Toss seeds in about 2 tsp. melted butter and salt to taste. Spread on a baking sheet in a single layer and bake in a preheated 300F oven for 45 minutes or until golden brown. Stir occasionally.

+ Turnips store best without their greens. Store the roots, wrapped in a moist towel or placed in a plastic bag, in the crisper drawer of the fridge. The roots will last for a couple of weeks. If you aren’t using the greens immediately, they can also be removed from the roots, wrapped in a moist towel or placed in a plastic bag and stored in the crisper drawer of the fridge. The greens will probably last 3-4 days. Make sure you check out the turnip greens recipe in the recipe section!

+ Lettuce and other greens like spinach store best in the crisper drawer of the fridge in a plastic bag. Both the lettuce mix and spinach are best used within a week.

+ Fennel bulbs are best stored in a plastic bag in the crisper drawer of the fridge. They will last for several weeks. You can use both the bulb and the fronds of the fennel. Fennel has a licorice type flavor. Fennel can be used in a variety of ways. Try braising, sautéing, roasting, or grilling it. You can also eat it raw on salads. The fronds can be saved for garnishes or to add to salads.

+ Tomatoes store best in a single layer, shoulder side down on the kitchen counter. If you have super ripe tomatoes, those can go in the fridge for up to a week, but the flavor will start to decline. If you can even keep them around for this long, tomatoes are best eaten between 4-7 days. (If kept at room temperature).

+ Green Beans store best in the plastic bag you received them in, placed in the crisper drawer of the fridge. They will need to be washed first before eating. Expect them to last for about a week.

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Early morning radish harvest.

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Recipes

For your convenience this week’s recipes in a printable format.

Meal Plan Menu

Thursday:

Another quick salad for dinner tonight. Add some fennel fronds as a garnish. Leftover veggies from last week? Chop some up to add to the salad.

Basic Vinaigrette

Ingredients:
1 cup olive oil or vegetable oil
1/3 cup vinegar
1/4 tsp. salt
1/8 tsp. white pepper or black pepper

Directions:
Whisk together or shake together in a jar. Serve chilled.

Friday:

Bright Lentil Salad With Apples, Fennel, and Herbs

Ingredients:
1 tablespoon cider vinegar
1/4 teaspoon granulated sugar
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon water
1 medium fennel bulb, finely diced (about 1 cup)
1 apple (recommended: Pink Lady), peeled and finely diced (about 1 cup)
8 ounces baby plum tomatoes, finely diced (or whatever tomatoes you got at the share)
2 (14.5-ounces) cans of Puy lentils, drained and rinsed
1 tablespoon fresh thyme
2 tablespoons fresh basil

Directions:
In a large bowl, whisk together the vinegar, sugar, salt, and pepper until the sugar dissolves. Add in the olive oil, and whisk until emulsified. Add the water, and whisk to loosen. Add the fennel, apple, and tomatoes, toss to combine, and allow to sit in the vinaigrette for 15 minutes. Finally, add the lentils and fresh herbs, and allow to sit another 15 minutes. Serve.

Saturday:

The pie pumpkins will work just fine in this recipe.

Creamy Winter Squash Soup

Ingredients:
1 ounce (2 tablespoons) unsalted butter
1 medium onion, finely chopped (1 cup)
2 small garlic cloves, minced (2 teaspoons)
Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
2 stems fresh rosemary
4 fresh sage leaves
2 pounds buttercup, butternut, Hubbard, or kabocha squash, peeled, seeded, and cut into 2-inch cubes
1 pound Yukon Gold potatoes (about 2 medium), peeled and cut into 2-inch cubes
3 cups homemade or store-bought low-sodium chicken stock, plus more if needed

Directions:
Melt butter in a medium stockpot over medium heat. Add onion, garlic, and 1 teaspoon salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until onion is translucent, about 5 minutes.

Place rosemary and sage on a small square of cheesecloth, and tie with kitchen string. Stir in the herb sachet, squash, potatoes, stock, and water. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a simmer, and cook until vegetables are soft, about 15 minutes. Discard herb sachet. Let cool slightly.

Working in batches, puree soup in a blender until smooth. Adjust to desired consistency with stock or water. (Soup can be made up to 2 days ahead; warm over low heat.) Season with salt and pepper. Serve topped with croutons.

+++

Spiced Pumpkin Pie with Brown Sugar Bourbon Whipped Cream

Ingredients:
1 All-Butter Pie Crust (See below)
1 ½ cups pumpkin pureé (fresh of course!)…or one 15 oz can
1 ¼ cups heavy cream or evaporated milk
½ cup light brown sugar
2 large eggs
2 Tbs Kentucky bourbon
1 tsp ground ginger
1 tsp cinnamon
½ tsp allspice
½ tsp salt
Brown Sugar Bourbon Whipped Cream (see below)

Directions:
Preheat the oven to 425°F.  Line a 9-inch glass pie plate with the All-Butter Pie Crust and refrigerate.  In a bowl, mix the pumpkin pureé, cream or evaporated milk, brown sugar, eggs, bourbon, ginger, cinnamon, allspice, and salt.  Place the pie plate with the crust on a rimmed baking sheet.  Pour the pumpkin mixture into the prepared pie shell.  Bake for 15 minutes.  Reduce the temperature to 350°F and bake for about 40 more minutes, or until the filling no longer jiggles in the middle when the pan is gently moved back and forth.  Cool the pie on a rack and refrigerate until ready to serve.  Top with Brown Sugar Whipped Cream.

All-Butter Pie Crust

Ingredients:
1/2 cup butter, cut into 1-inch slices
1 1/2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
1 tsp sugar
1/2 tsp salt
3-4 Tbs ice water

Directions:
Place the butter in the freezer to chill.  Meanwhile, blend the flour, sugar, and salt in a food processor with the metal blade.  Add the butter and pulse the processor on and off until the butter is the size of large peas.  With the processor still running, drizzle in the water.  Stop processing when the dough starts to form a ball.  Do not overmix.  Place the dough onto a large piece of plastic wrap.  Fold the plastic wrap over and around the dough to seal, and press the dough into the shape of a disc.  Refrigerate for at least 1 hour.

After the dough has chilled, unwrap and place it on a lightly floured surface.  Roll into an 11-inch circle and place the dough into a 9-inch pie pan.  Flute the edge if desired.  Refrigerate until ready to fill.

Brown Sugar Bourbon Whipped Cream

Ingredients:
1 cup heavy whipped cream
1 Tbs Kentucky bourbon
¼ cup light brown sugar

Directions:
Place the cream, the bowl, and the electric beaters or whisk in the freezer for 10 minutes.  In the chilled bowl, mix the bourbon and brown sugar until the sugar is dissolved.  Add the heavy cream and beat with an electric mixer until thick.

Results in a tan-colored whipped cream.

Sunday:

Serve this frico as a side dish to any entree.

Spinach Frico

Submitted by Eliza Bodkin from The Food Matters Cookbook by Mark Bittman

Ingredients:
2 Tablespoons olive oil
2 cups spinach leaves, chopped
Black pepper
2 cups grated Parmesan or Manchego cheese

Directions:
1. Put the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. When it’s hot, add the spinach and cook, stirring, until the leaves have wilted and all of their liquid has evaporated, 4 to 5 minutes. Sprinkle with a good amount of black pepper and the Parmesan and stir.

2. Use a rubber spatula to distribute the spinach and cheese evenly over the bottom of the pan. Cook until the cheese is melted and golden brown on the bottom, about 2 minutes.

3. Use the spatula to slide the crisp onto a plate; put another plate on top of the crisp. Put one hand firmly in the center of the bottom plate and the other hand the same way on the top plate; flip the crisp over. Use the spatula to slide it back into the pan and continue cooking until the cheese is golden brown, 1 to 2 minutes. Serve whole as an appetizer or broken into smaller pieces as a garnish.

Monday:

Even though this week’s variety of turnips are a purple top turnip, this recipe will still work well to use both the roots and greens.

Glazed Hakurei Turnips

Bring out the flavor in these most delicate and delicious Japanese turnips.

Ingredients:
1 bunch hakurei turnips,, trimmed, and quartered, greens reserved
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter
3 tablespoons sugar
Kosher salt

Directions:
Place turnips in a large skillet; add water to cover turnips halfway. Add butter, sugar, and a large pinch of salt; bring to a boil. Cook, stirring occasionally, until liquid is syrupy and turnips are tender, about 15 minutes. (If turnips are tender before liquid has reduced, use a slotted spoon to transfer turnips to a plate and reduce liquid until syrupy. Return turnips to pan and stir to coat well.) DO AHEAD: Can be made 4 hours ahead. Let stand at room temperature. Rewarm before continuing.

Add turnip greens to skillet and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until just wilted, 2–3 minutes. Season with salt.

Tuesday: 

Grilled Tomatoes with Goat Cheese and Sage

Ingredients:
2 tablespoons olive oil
4 tablespoons chopped fresh sage (about 1 ounce), divided
1/2 cup soft fresh goat cheese
2 teaspoons sliced green onions
1 shallot, minced
1/4 teaspoon salt
4 medium tomatoes

Directions:
Heat oil in medium skillet over medium-high heat. Add 3 tablespoons fresh sage and fry 30 seconds. Using slotted spoon, transfer fried sage to paper towel.

Combine cheese, onions, shallot, salt, and remaining 1 tablespoon fresh sage in bowl. Season with pepper. Using small sharp knife, remove cone-shaped piece 2 inches wide and 1 inch deep from top of each tomato. Divide cheese mixture among tomatoes; top with fried sage.

Prepare barbecue (medium-high heat). Place tomatoes on grill rack; cover barbecue with lid. Cook until tomatoes are soft, about 5 minutes.

Wednesday:  

Leftovers day! Clean out that fridge for new vegetables coming Thursday.

Preview Week 18

We’re excited about some more fall leafy vegetables coming your way this week!

-Lettuce Mix

-Spinach

-Pie Pumpkins! Who is ready for fall and pie making?!

-Turnips with greens – greens are great for cooking and eating, too.

-Tomatoes – this *may* be the last week, and we’ll have some green tomatoes to give out soon too.

-Fennel bulb OR Watermelon Radish bunch

While our main CSA is entering the last 5 weeks, we have a smaller Fall CSA program planned to keep the veggies coming out of the fields as we move into late fall. Our Fall CSA program will be 8 weeks in length, feature smaller shares of 4-5 items a week, and will include a week long break for Thanksgiving and Thanksgiving Box sales. Our popular Thanksgiving Boxes will be available for pre-order soon as well, for $30 a box.

Stay tuned for sign ups!

CSA Newsletter Week 17, September 13th

Farm Notes

We have enjoyed the cooler, Fall-like weather this week. However, it looks like the temperatures will be warming back up over the remainder of the week and into the weekend. Don’t these crisp cool mornings just make you long for fall and pumpkins, all the lettuces and greens, potatoes and root crops? If your answer is yes!, then don’t you worry. We’re slowly petering out on our summer classics like sweet corn, tomatoes and summer squash and slowing introducing fall greens like the chard, lettuce heads, carrots and winter squash.

Don’t forget! Saturday You-Pick is THIS Saturday, September 15th from 9-11am. Come out with your family or friend and pick cherry tomatoes (while they last…definitely slowing), plenty of hot peppers, herbs and flowers.

We are still taking pre-orders for Tomato Boxes. Tomato boxes consist of “second” tomatoes which are those that have blemishes and /or are super ripe and ready to be processed ASAP. Each tomato box is $25 for 25 lbs. We are also selling cabbage boxes for sauerkraut (or whatever cabbage thing you love to make!). Each box is 5 heads (or equivalent) of green cabbage for $10. Reserve your box by emailing uk.csa@uky.edu or talk to us at the Farm Stand at pick-up. If you have already reserved a box, you will receive an email from us TODAY with what you have pre-ordered and where to pick it up.

The UK Winery will be set up on CAMPUS this Thursday from 4-6pm, with the CSA. They will also be at the Farm pick-up location from 3:30-6:30pm. You may also purchase wine from them on Fridays at the farm in the classroom building from 2-6pm. Check out their blog site, ukywine.com for more information on wine varieties and prices.

What’s In Your Share

For this week, you’ll receive:
+ Cucumber
+ Eggplant
+ Corn
+ Spaghetti OR Acorn Winter Squash
+ Mixed Sweet Peppers
+ Tomatoes
+ Lettuce Head OR Kale (limited quantities)
+ Carrots
+ Banana Peppers

Farm Stand

The CSA Farm Stand (which is for purchasing “extras”) will be set up at both the campus (from 4-6pm) and farm (from 3:30-6:30pm) locations. Items available will be on a first come, first served basis. For the campus location, we will be set up a little differently this year. The Farm Stand will be located all the way to the right of the pick-up line with it’s own tent and table. So please do not go through the regular pick-up line to buy a la carte.  At the farm, the Farm Stand table will also be set up separately from the regular pick-up line. We accept cash, check and *NEW* this year, credit cards.

Items Available for Purchase this Week:
+ Corn: $0.50 per ear
+ Bell/Sweet Peppers: $1 each
+ Eggplant: $1 each
+ Spaghetti, Acorn Squash: $2 each
+ Carrots: $3/bag
+ Pencil-sized leeks: $3/bunch
+ Lettuce Head/Kale: $3 each (VERY limited quantities)
+ Banana Peppers: $0.25 each
+ Cucumbers: $0.50 each (VERY limited quantities)
+ Tomatoes: $3/lb.

You-Pick

+ Every week that there is you-pick available we will list what is available in the weekly newsletter. The first time you come to the farm we ask that you find one of the organic team (in the organic shed or out in the fields) for a you-pick orientation.

+ You will need to bring your own harvest containers and – if you are interested in okra or flowers – your own pruners or scissors.  All you-pick crops will also be marked in the field with a “you-pick” sign. In 2018 the main you-pick field is located south of the parking lot towards Waveland Museum Road, but close to the farm’s access road.

+ We ask that you park your vehicle in the parking lot and walk to the you-pick area to keep vehicles out of our fields. However, if you require assistance to get to our fields or if there is an issue of accessibility, we can make exceptions but please talk to a staff member first for guidelines.

You-Pick Hours:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday  – 7:30am until 4pm
Thursday – 7am until 6:30pm

We are closed on all major holidays including Memorial Day, 4th of July, and Labor Day.
+ Please only pick from the beds that have a sign saying “You-Pick”. Not everything is ready or available to pick at this time.

Items available:
+ Flowers
+ Herbs
+ Hot Peppers
+ Sunflowers
+ Cherry Tomatoes
+ We have a perennial herb bed, right to the west of the You-Pick field. Most of the herbs are the same as what is in You-Pick, however many are more mature, such as the sage, chives and oregano. There is also spearmint in the perennial bed.

Veggie Tips (or Facts)

+ Acorn squash is a great squash for stuffing! Spaghetti squash really does make a spaghetti-like dish when cooked. The texture is slightly crispy, but very delicious as a pasta substitute. Winter squash should be stored in a single layer on a kitchen counter or someplace cool. Room temperature is also fine. You can expect your squash to last about a month, but if you wish to prolong it’s shelf-stability, you can wipe the skin with a damp cloth and dish soap or a 1 part bleach in 10 parts water to prevent decay. Make sure to fully dry the squash.

+ This week’s corn is a little buggy. You may find some pests (corn earworm and/or sap beetles) inside the husks. You can simply cut off the damaged part before cooking. It’s probably better to actually remove the husks and clean before cooking, rather than grilling, just to ensure you aren’t cooking any pests along with it. Corn is best eaten within the first 5 days. The quality and sweetness of corn will decrease the longer it is being stored. Store with the husks on in the fridge.

+ Lettuce and other greens like kale store best in the crisper drawer of the fridge in a plastic bag. Both the lettuce and kale will last for about a week. The kale is a baby kale mix and can be eaten raw (like in a salad) or cooked.

+ Carrots and other root vegetables store best in a plastic bag in the crisper drawer of the fridge. Store for up to 3 or 4 weeks. Problem with limpy carrots? Place in a cup or bowl of cold water and store in the fridge for a few hours. The roots will firm back up.

+ Cucumbers can be stored in a cool place in a perforated plastic bag. The fridge is not an ideal storage place, but if you do refrigerate, place in the crisper drawer of the fridge and make sure to keep the temperature above 40F. Cucumbers are best eaten within the week.

+ Eggplant is similar to summer squash and peppers. You can store them in perforated bags in a cool place in the kitchen. However, if you do choose to store in the fridge, it is best to store in the crisper drawer and not below 50F. Keep eggplant away from ethylene producers. Eggplant is best within 3-5 days, though it can keep up to a few weeks.

+ All peppers can either be stored in a cool place in the kitchen, or in the crisper drawer of the fridge. Peppers may last up to 2 weeks.

+ Tomatoes store best in a single layer, shoulder side down on the kitchen counter. If you have super ripe tomatoes, those can go in the fridge for up to a week, but the flavor will start to decline. If you can even keep them around for this long, tomatoes are best eaten between 4-7 days. (If kept at room temperature).

Recipes

For your convenience this week’s recipes in a printable format.

Meal Plan Menu

Thursday:

Return of the salads! You’ve even got cucumber, tomato and carrot to add!

Try this Sweet and Tart Mustard Dressing from Mollie Katzen’s Moosewood Cookbook.

Ingredients:
6 tbsp. olive oil
2 tbsp. Dijon mustard
4 tbsp. red wine vinegar
2 tsp. real maple syrup or honey
salt and pepper, to taste

Directions:
Whisk everything together. Cover and chill.

+++

Braised Kale with Diced Tomato

Ingredients:
2 Tbs olive oil
4 cloves garlic, sliced
1 1/2 cups diced fresh tomatoes or one 15-oz can
1 tsp ground cumin
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp crushed red pepper flakes
1/4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
1 pound chopped fresh kale (use what you have available)

Directions:
In a Dutch oven or large skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook while stirring for about 1 minutes. Stir in the tomatoes, cumin, salt, red pepper flakes, and pepper. Add the kale and toss with the tomatoes. Cover and cook for about 15 minutes, until the kale is tender.

Friday:

Breakfast for dinner……but with vegetables???

Carrots Cakes by Rachel Ray

Ingredients:
Fluffy Pancakes with Syrup*
3/4 cup cooked, pureed carrots
1/4 cup chopped walnuts
1 tablespoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
Whipped cream cheese
1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar

Directions:
In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder, walnuts, cinnamon and salt. In another bowl, whisk together the milk, egg yolks, pureed carrot and melted butter. Pour the wet mixture into the dry and stir until just combined.
Preheat a griddle or large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Meanwhile, beat the egg whites to soft peaks. Gently fold the whites into the batter.
Grease the griddle and ladle on 1/4-cup portions of batter. Cook on 1 side until bubbles form and the pancakes are cooked around the edges, 1 1/2 to 2 minutes. Flip and cook through, 1 minute more. Blend whipped cream cheese and 1/4 cup confectioners sugar to top; dust with more sugar.

*Ingredients:
1 1/2 cups flour
3 tablespoons sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/4 cups milk
2 eggs, separated
3 tablespoons butter, melted, plus more (unmelted) for serving
Maple syrup, for serving

Directions:
In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. In another bowl, whisk together the milk, egg yolks and melted butter. Pour the wet mixture into the dry and stir until just combined.
Preheat a griddle or large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Meanwhile, beat the egg whites to soft peaks. Gently fold the whites into the batter.
Grease the griddle and ladle on 1/4-cup portions of batter. Cook on 1 side until bubbles form and the pancakes are cooked around the edges, 1 1/2 to 2 minutes. Flip and cook through, 1 minute more. Serve with butter and maple syrup.

Saturday:

Eggplant-Almond Enchiladas
From Moosewood Cookbook by Mollie Katzen

Serve with rice and plain beans. You’ll need a batch of Mexican Red Sauce, made in advance. See below for recipe.

Ingredients:
1 tbsp. olive oil
1 cup minced onion
6 cups diced eggplant (about 1 large or 2 small)
1 tsp. salt (or more to taste)
lots of black pepper
4 medium cloves of garlic, minced
1 medium green bell pepper, minced
1 cup lightly toasted almonds, minced
1 packed cup grated jack cheese (or similar mild white cheese)
12 corn tortillas
1 batch Mexican Red Sauce (below)

Directions:
Heat olive oil in a deep skillet or Dutch oven. Add onion and saute for about 5 minutes over medium heat. Add eggplant, salt and pepper and mix well. Cover and cook for about 10 minutes over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until the eggplant is soft. Add garlic and bell pepper. Stir and cook 5-8 more minutes, or until the pepper is just tender. Taste to correct salt. Remove from heat; stir in almonds and cheese. Preheat oven to 350F. Moisten each tortilla briefly in water, then place approximately 1/4 cup of filling on one side and roll up. Gently situate the filled enchiladas in a baking pan. Pour a batch of sauce over the top. Bake uncovered for about 30 minutes.

+++

Mexican Red Sauce

Ingredients:
2 tsp. olive oil
1 cup minced onion
1/2 tsp. salt
1 1/2 tsp. cumin
2 tsp. chili powder
3 cups chopped tomatoes (4-6 medium size)-peeling and seeding optional
1 cup of water or tomato juice
black pepper and cayenne, to taste
4-6 medium cloves garlic, minced
optional: freshly minced cilantro, for the top

Directions:
Heat olive oil in a medium-sized saucepan. Add onion and salt and saute over medium heat for about 5 minutes, or until the onion is translucent. Add cumin and chili powder and saute about 5 minutes more. Add chopped tomatoes and water or juice. Bring to a boil, partially cover, and lower heat. Simmer at least 30 minutes (or even longer). Add the black pepper, cayenne and garlic at any time during the cooking. (The later you add the garlic, the more distinct its presence). Add the cilantro when you are finished cooking the sauce. The sauce can be left in chunky form or you can puree all or part of it in a blender or food processor.

Sunday:

Spaghetti Squash with Fresh Tomatoes and Rosemary

Ingredients:
1 spaghetti squash
Kosher salt
1 1/2 pounds tomatoes, seeds removed, roughly chopped
1 tablespoon fresh rosemary (or more to taste)
1 clove garlic, coarsely chopped
Dash dried pepper flakes
2 Tablespoons olive oil
Freshly grated parmigiano reggiano cheese

Directions:
Preheat oven 450 degrees.

Carefully slice spaghetti squash in half lengthwise. Use a spoon to scoop out the seeds, discard. Place squash cut side down on an aluminum foil lined baking sheet. Bake for 30-45 minutes, until they can be easily pierced with a pairing knife. Remove from oven and allow to cool to room temperature. Using a fork, scrape the strands of squash from the inside of the skin. Season with ½ teaspoon of coarse sea salt.

In a food processor combine 1 cup of the chopped tomatoes, the rosemary, garlic, red pepper flakes, ½ teaspoon salt, and olive oil. Puree until smooth.

In a large bowl combine the spaghetti squash, chopped tomatoes, and tomato puree. Taste and add additional salt to taste. Serve warm or at room temperature with a sprinkle of freshly grated parmigiano reggiano cheese.

+++

Roasted Acorn Squash with Maple Glaze

Any hard-shelled winter squash can be prepared this way, as long as the squash wedges have a cavity to hold the butter and maple syrup. Serve with pork chops, roast chicken, or roast duck.

Ingredients:
1 acorn squash, about 2 ½ pounds
Kosher or sea salt
4 tsp unsalted butter
4 tsp maple syrup
¼ cup water

Directions:
1. Preheat the oven to 375°F. With a cleaver or heavy chef’s knife, cut across the top of the squash to remove the stem, then quarter the squash lengthwise and remove the seeds and stringy fibers in the seed cavity.

2. Put the squash quarters, cavity side up, in a bakinG dish just large enough to hold them comfortably. Season the squash with salt, then put 1 tsp butter and 1 tsp maple syrup in each cavity. Pour the water into the baking dish, then cover the dish and bake until the squash is tender when pierced, about 45 minutes.

3. Pour any juice from the squash-cavities in to the baking dish, then transfer the squash quarters to a serving platter. Transfer all the juices from the baking dish into a small pan and place over high heat. Cook until reduced to a syrup, then spoon the syrup over the squash. Let rest for 10-15 minutes before serving. The squash is best when it is not piping hot.

Monday:

Tomato Salad

Submitted by CSA Member Hayriye Cetin Karaca from turkishfoodandrecipes.com

Ingredients:
2 medium red ripe tomatoes or 10 cherry tomatoes, cut in bite sizes
½ medium red or white onion, chopped
2 tbsp olive oil
1 tsp vinegar or 1 tbsp lemon juice
1/3 cup feta cheese, crumbled
½ tsp basil (optional)
1 small green pepper, diagonally sliced (optional)
¼ bunch of fresh parsley for garnish
½ tsp salt

Directions:
Place tomatoes, onions and pepper (optional) in a salad plate. In a small bowl mix the olive oil, salt, vinegar/lemon juice and basil (optional). Pour this mixture on the salad and mix. Then add the crumbled feta cheese on top. Garnish with the parsley. You can also chop the parsley and mix with the salad.

Tuesday: 

Creamy Corn Soup
From The Practical Produce Cookbook by Ray and Elsie Hoover

Ingredients:
1/2 cup chopped celery
1/4 cup chopped onion
1 tbsp. butter
3 cups chicken or vegetable broth
2 cups corn
1/2 cup sliced carrots
1 cup light cream

Directions:
Cook celery and onion in butter until onion is tender but not brown. Add broth, corn and carrots. Bring to a boil; reduce heat. Simmer, covered, for 10-12 minutes. Stir in cream and heat through.

Wednesday:  

Leftovers day! Clean out that fridge for new vegetables coming Thursday.

Preview Week 17

Well, we had over 5 inches of rain over the weekend…! What a deluge. Hopefully our crops will manage that and keep thriving, but we may need to see if there is any fallout in the next week or two.

For this week, we have some more items fun items coming to shares. Items may include:

+ Winter Squash: Spaghetti or Acorn

+ Carrots

+ Fall Green! Either head Lettuce or Kale

+ Peppers

+ Tomatoes! Still coming but slowing. Some of our tomatoes plants are done producing for the year.

+ Corn – this is the last of it for the year!

CSA Newsletter Week 16, September 6th

Farm Notes

Due to Labor Day this Monday, the past couple of days have been super busy; getting all the harvests done, giving tours to GEN 100 classes from UK, cleaning up fields in preparation for cover cropping. It’s almost hard to believe it’s already Thursday. Be prepared for this week’s share…it will be a big one with a few extra surprises!

We are still taking pre-orders for Tomato Boxes. Tomato boxes consist of “second” tomatoes which are those that have blemishes and /or are super ripe and ready to be processed ASAP. Each tomato box is $25 for 25 lbs. We are also selling cabbage boxes for sauerkraut (or whatever cabbage thing you love to make!). Each box is 5 heads (or equivalent) of green cabbage for $10. Reserve your box by emailing uk.csa@uky.edu or talk to us at the Farm Stand at pick-up. If you have already reserved a box, you will receive an email from us TODAY with what you have pre-ordered and where to pick it up.

The UK Winery will be set up on CAMPUS this Thursday from 4-6pm, with the CSA. They will also be at the Farm pick-up location from 3:30-6:30pm. You may also purchase wine from them on Fridays at the farm in the classroom building from 2-6pm. Check out their blog site, ukywine.com for more information on wine varieties and prices.

What’s In Your Share

For this week, you’ll receive:
+ Zucchini
+ Eggplant
+ Corn
+ Delicata Winter Squash
+ Mixed Sweet Peppers
+ Tomatoes
+ Hot Peppers
+ Red Onions
+ Chard
+ Cucumber
+ Dill OR Cilantro
+ Sorbet Swirl Watermelon
+ Cantaloupe for Farm. (Campus pick-up received their cantaloupe last week).

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A whole pile of corn harvested this morning.

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Farm Stand

The CSA Farm Stand (which is for purchasing “extras”) will be set up at both the campus (from 4-6pm) and farm (from 3:30-6:30pm) locations. Items available will be on a first come, first served basis. For the campus location, we will be set up a little differently this year. The Farm Stand will be located all the way to the right of the pick-up line with it’s own tent and table. So please do not go through the regular pick-up line to buy a la carte.  At the farm, the Farm Stand table will also be set up separately from the regular pick-up line. We accept cash, check and *NEW* this year, credit cards.

Items Available for Purchase this Week:
+ Corn: $0.50 per ear
+ Bell/Sweet Peppers: $1 each
+ Eggplant: $1 each
+ Delicata Winter Squash: $2 each or 2 for $3
+ Tomatoes: $3/lb.
+ Hot Peppers: $0.25 each
+ Red Onions: $0.50 each
+ Chard: $3/bunch
+ Celery: $3/bunch (very limited quantity)
+ Dill: $3/bunch
+ Cilantro: $3/bunch

You-Pick

+ Every week that there is you-pick available we will list what is available in the weekly newsletter. The first time you come to the farm we ask that you find one of the organic team (in the organic shed or out in the fields) for a you-pick orientation.

+ You will need to bring your own harvest containers and – if you are interested in okra or flowers – your own pruners or scissors.  All you-pick crops will also be marked in the field with a “you-pick” sign. In 2018 the main you-pick field is located south of the parking lot towards Waveland Museum Road, but close to the farm’s access road.

+ We ask that you park your vehicle in the parking lot and walk to the you-pick area to keep vehicles out of our fields. However, if you require assistance to get to our fields or if there is an issue of accessibility, we can make exceptions but please talk to a staff member first for guidelines.

You-Pick Hours:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday  – 7:30am until 4pm
Thursday – 7am until 6:30pm

We are closed on all major holidays including Memorial Day, 4th of July, and Labor Day.
+ Please only pick from the beds that have a sign saying “You-Pick”. Not everything is ready or available to pick at this time.

Items available:
+ Okra is slowing way down…it may get mowed soon, so get it while it’s still out there.
+ Flowers
+ Herbs
+ Hot Peppers
+ Sunflowers
+ Cherry Tomatoes
+ We have a perennial herb bed, right to the west of the You-Pick field. Most of the herbs are the same as what is in You-Pick, however many are more mature, such as the sage, chives and oregano. There is also spearmint in the perennial bed.

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Thai Chile plants are exploding with peppers!

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Veggie Tips (or Facts)

+ The watermelon variety for this week is called Sorbet Swirl. This variety does have seeds, but it has a beautiful yellow flesh. Unfortunately the plants starting dying back due to disease and pest issues and we needed to go ahead and harvest the melons. A lot of the melons are small, but when we checked one of the small ones, the fruit tasted sweet and mature. Also, these melons will not last long in your fridge. I would eat them as soon as possible. If you don’t think you can eat your melon fast enough, you could always cut it up into cubes, freeze on a tray in a single layer and store in a container in the freezer. Then, you can add watermelon ice cubes to your water, lemonade or sangrias!

+ The first round of winter squash is a variety called Delicata. This squash makes a great boat for stuffing or if sliced into half-moons and roasted, you can eat the whole thing, even the skin! If cooked long enough, the skin is thin enough to be edible. Winter squash should be stored in a single layer on a kitchen counter or someplace cool. Room temperature is also fine. You can expect your squash to last about a month, but if you wish to prolong it’s shelf-stability, you can wipe the skin with a damp cloth and dish soap or a 1 part bleach in 10 parts water to prevent decay. Make sure to fully dry the squash.

+ The red onions have been processed. You can store them in a cool place in the kitchen for a couple of weeks.

+ Both the chard and kale are best stored in a plastic bag in the crisper drawer of the fridge for 5 days and possibly up to two weeks.

+ This week’s corn is a little buggy. You may find some pests (corn earworm and/or sap beetles) inside the husks. You can simply cut off the damaged part before cooking. It’s probably better to actually remove the husks and clean before cooking, rather than grilling, just to ensure you aren’t cooking any pests along with it. Corn is best eaten within the first 5 days. The quality and sweetness of corn will decrease the longer it is being stored. Store with the husks on in the fridge.

+ Cucumbers can be stored in a cool place in a perforated plastic bag. The fridge is not an ideal storage place, but if you do refrigerate, place in the crisper drawer of the fridge and make sure to keep the temperature above 40F. Cucumbers are best eaten within the week.

+ Dill and cilantro can be stored in the refrigerator. Place stems in a cup of water to keep fresh. Both will last for about a week.

+ Summer Squash can either be stored in a plastic bag in the crisper drawer or left on the kitchen counter in a cool place. Summer squash is best eaten fresh (within 4 days), although it could last up to 1-2 weeks.

+ Eggplant is similar to summer squash and peppers. You can store them in perforated bags in a cool place in the kitchen. However, if you do choose to store in the fridge, it is best to store in the crisper drawer and not below 50F. Keep eggplant away from ethylene producers. Eggplant is best within 3-5 days, though it can keep up to a few weeks.

+ All peppers can either be stored in a cool place in the kitchen, or in the crisper drawer of the fridge. Peppers may last up to 2 weeks. Nervous about your hot peppers and don’t know what to do with them? Make it into a jam!

Jalapeño Jam

Submitted by apprentice Cheryl Kastanowski

Ingredients:
4 or more jalapeño peppers, seeded and chopped (or whatever hot peppers you choose)
1 1/3 cups canned apple juice
2 tablespoons vinegar
4 cups sugar
1 pouch liquid pectin
6 drops green food coloring — if desired

Directions:
Sterilize 4 pint or 8 half-pint jars by boiling 10 minutes. Heat lids and let stand in hot water until ready to use.

Place peppers, juice and vinegar into large saucepan. Measure sugar into separate bowl. Stir sugar into above mixture. Mix well. Add 1/2 teaspoon butter or margarine. Bring to a full rolling boil over high heat, stirring constantly. Open Certo and quickly pour contents into pan. Pour in food coloring. Bring to a full rolling boil, stirring constantly. Remove from heat.

Skim off any foam. Fill jars immediately to 1/8-inch from top of jar. Wipe jar rims and threads. Cover quickly with lids. Screw on bands tightly. Invert jars for 5 minutes, then turn upright. After 1 hour check seals, or process in a boiling water bath for 15 minutes.

Use this favorite Basque spread, pisto, on bread or toast or as a base for canapes made with smoked salmon, ham, anchovies, etc. From “The New Spanish Table” by Anya von Bremzen (Workman, 2005)

+ Tomatoes store best in a single layer, shoulder side down on the kitchen counter. If you have super ripe tomatoes, those can go in the fridge for up to a week, but the flavor will start to decline. If you can even keep them around for this long, tomatoes are best eaten between 4-7 days. (If kept at room temperature).

Recipes

For your convenience this week’s recipes in a printable format.

Meal Plan Menu

Thursday:

Panzanella Bread Salad Recipe

From Simply Recipes

As you cut the tomatoes, remove some of the seeds and liquid. Your panzanella will be juicy enough. Leave the crusts on the bread chunks; they will stay chewier and give the panzanella more substance.

Ingredients:
4 cups tomatoes, cut into large chunks
4 cups day old (somewhat dry and hard) crusty bread (Italian or French loaf), cut into chunks the same size as the tomatoes*
1 cucumber, skinned and seeded, cut into large chunks
1/2 red onion, chopped
1 bunch fresh basil, torn into little pieces
1/4 to 1/2 cup good olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste
* If you don’t have hard old bread sitting around, you can take fresh crusty bread, cut it into big cubes, lay the cubes out on a baking sheet, and put in a 300°F oven for 5-10 minutes, until the outer edges have dried out a bit (not toasted, just dried). If you use fresh bread without doing this, the bread may disintegrate into mush in the salad.

Directions:
Mix everything together and let marinate, covered, at room temperature for at least 30 minutes, up to 12 hours. Do not refrigerate or you will destroy the texture of the tomatoes.

Serve at room temperature. Yields 6-8 servings.

Friday:

Serve this roasted delicata squash as a side, or make it the star of dinner with the stuffed recipe below.

Roasted Delicata Squash

Ingredients:
2 delicata squash
2 tbsp olive oil
Salt to taste

Directions:
Preheat oven to 425 degrees.

Clean the delicata squash by running under warm water and scrubbing away dirt with your hands. If there are any hard spots on the squash, you can scrape them off with a butter knife.
With a sharp knife, cut delicata in half lengthwise. With a spoon scoop out the seeds and discard. Cut each delicata half into 1/2 inch segments, creating moon-shaped pieces that have slight bumps around the curve.

Arrange the pieces in a single layer in a baking pan and coat in 2 tbsp olive oil Salt gently. Place in oven and roast 10 minutes. Using a spatula flip the squash, and continue roasting, turning every 7-10 minutes until both sides of the squash pieces are golden brown and the texture is creamy to the teeth all the way through, about 25-30 minutes. Adjust salt.

Serve as a side dish.

+++

Stuffed Delicata Squash

From Eating Well magazine

Ingredients:
2 small delicata squash, about 12 oz each, halved and seeded
6 tsp extra virgin olive oil, divided
1/2 tsp salt, divided
1/2 cup bulgur
1 cup water
1 small onion, chopped
8 oz lean ground beef (90% or more)
2 Tbsp chili powder
1/2 cup nonfat or low fat plain yogurt
4 tsp toasted pepitas

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 425 F.

2. Brush the cut sides of the squash with 2 tsp oil and sprinkle with 1/4 tsp salt. Place facedown on a large baking sheet. Bake until tender and browned on the edges, 25 to 30 minutes.

3. Meanwhile, bring bulgur and water to a boil in a small saucepan. Reduce heat, cover and simmer until tender and most of the liquid is absorbed, about 10 minutes. Drain well.

4. Heat the remaining 4 tsp oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onion; cook, stirring, until beginning to brown, 4 to 5 minutes. Add beef, chili powder, and the remaining 1/4 tsp salt; cook, stirring and breaking up with a spoon, until the meat is cooked through, about 5 minutes. Stir in the bulgur and cook 1 minute. Stir in yogurt.

5. Spoon about 3/4 cup filling into each squash half. Serve sprinkled with pepitas.

Serves 4, 1/2 squash each.

Saturday:

Chard Casserole
From The Practical Produce Cookbook by Ray and Elsie Hoover

Ingredients:
2 lbs. chard
1 tsp. salt, divided
5 tbsp. butter, divided
3 tbsp. flour
2 cups milk
1/4 cup shredded swiss cheese
1/4 cup grated parmesan cheese
1/4 cup soft bread crumbs

Directions:
Wash chard well; drain. Cut off stalks and cut into 1 inch pieces. Coarsely chop leaves. Bring 1 inch water to a boil in a large kettle. Add chard stalks and 1/2 tsp. salt. Reduce heat. Cover and cook 3 minutes. Stir in chard leaves and cook 2 minutes. Drain well. Melt 3 tbsp. butter. Stir in flour and 1/2 tsp. salt. Gradually stir in milk until smooth. Stir constantly until mixture boils and thickens. Remove from heat and stir in chard and cheese. Turn into a 2 quart casserole. Top with bread crumbs and remaining butter. Bake at 425º approximately 20 minutes.

Sunday:

Stuffed Eggplants
From The Practical Produce Cookbook by Ray and Elsie Hoover

Ingredients:
2 medium eggplants
salt
oil
salt and pepper
1 cup chopped onion
4 tbsp. olive or vegetable oil
1 lb. ground beef
1 tbsp. fresh chopped parsley
1 cup peeled, seeded and chopped tomatoes
1 cup cooked rice
3/4 tsp. salt
parmesan cheese (optional)

Directions:
Cut eggplants in half lengthwise. Make several cuts on the exposed flesh. Sprinkle with salt and drain 30 minutes, flesh side down. Squeeze and pat dry. Brush with oil. Put a little water into a baking pan and bake eggplants at 400º, cut side up, 15-20 minutes. Scoop out flesh leaving 1/2 inch of flesh on shells. Sprinkle eggplants with salt and pepper. Chop flesh. Saute onions in oil several minutes then add eggplant flesh and saute until golden brown. Remove from skillet and brown beef. When beef is browned add eggplant mixture, parsley, tomatoes, rice and salt. Mix well; fill eggplant shells and place in a baking dish. Sprinkle with parmesan cheese if desired. Bake at 400º approximately 20 minutes.

Monday:

Fresh Corn and Tomato Fettuccine
From tasteofhome.com

Ingredients:
8 ounces uncooked whole wheat fettuccine
2 medium ears sweet corn, husks removed
2 teaspoons plus 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1/2 cup chopped sweet red pepper
4 green onions, chopped
2 medium tomatoes, chopped
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1 cup crumbled feta cheese
2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley

Directions:
In a Dutch oven, cook fettuccine according to package directions, adding corn during the last 8 minutes of cooking.

Meanwhile, in a small skillet, heat 2 teaspoons oil over medium-high heat. Add red pepper and green onions; cook and stir until tender.

Drain pasta and corn; transfer pasta to a large bowl. Cool corn slightly; cut corn from cob and add to pasta. Add tomatoes, salt, pepper, remaining oil and the pepper mixture; toss to combine. Sprinkle with cheese and parsley.

Tuesday: 

Use whatever peppers you have on hand for this recipe and serve as a side.

Bell Peppers Lemonly Dressed and Cumin-esque

From Farmer John’s Cookbook

Ingredients:
1/2 cup plus and 1 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil, divided
2 red or purple bells, thinly sliced
2 green or yellow bells, thinly sliced
1/4 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice (1 large)
2 Tbsp minced parsley
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp honey (optional)
1 clove garlic, minced
1/4 cup finely chopped scallions or red onion
1/2 tsp salt
freshly ground black pepper

Directions:
1. Heat 1 Tbsp of oil in large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the peppers and saute, stirring until slightly soft, about 3 minutes. Let cool.

2. Combine the remaining oil, lemon juice, parsley, cumin, honey, and garlic in a large jar. With the lid tightly screwed on, shake the jar vigorously until the oil and juice have combined and thickened.

3. Toss the peppers and scallions or red onion with the vinaigrette in a large bowl, add the salt and season with pepper to taste. Refrigerate for 1 hour.

Serves 4.

Wednesday:  

Leftovers day! Clean out that fridge for new vegetables coming Thursday.

Preview Week 16

The long Labor Day weekend has us scrambling to play catch up with field harvests.

This week’s share will include:

Delicata Winter Squash – the first of several winter squashes for this year

Corn – at this time of year, it is hard to keep the bugs away, so plan to lop those tops off. We hope to have at least 1 more corn harvest coming in 1-2 weeks!

Eggplant

Tomatoes – this is our 11th straight week of tomatoes! While these are slowing, we’re hopeful to get a few more harvests squeezed in thanks to a later tomato planting.

Peppers

Onions

Dill or Cilantro

Don’t forget about the next South Farm dinner series on September 12th — tickets here!